10/21/14

Celebrities Who Kill Pt. Two

I had a few cute emails about my first celebrity murderers article and my brother ragged me about the lameness of the Laura Bush paragraph so I decided to give it another try. So here goes.

Charles S. Dutton
No wonder he is such a good actor. He has lived it all. Charles S. Dutton served prison sentences for manslaughter, illegal possession of a firearm and acting as the ringleader of a prison riot. He killed a man during a fight at age 17 and was sentenced to manslaughter. He served seven years. Once released, he was caught with a firearm and did three more years. He was a shit starter in prison and once, while in solitary confinement when he accidentally found himself with a book on black playwrights, he fell in love with acting.

Lillo Brancato Jr.
This is one of my favorite celebrity fuck-up stories. He's just so damn dumb. I loved Lillo in A Bronx Tale, a wonderful true story of life in the Bronx for a young Italian boy in the 50's. He was also on the Soprano's, another plus. After his brief dance with fame, poor Lillo got hooked on heroin. He and a buddy broke into a home with intent to burglarize for drugs and an off-duty police officer intervened. The friend shot and killed him. Lillo was sentenced to 10 years and was paroled in 2013.




Skylar Deleon
Here is another raging dumbass. He had a teensy-weensy bit part in The Mighty Morphin Power Rangers in the 90's as a kid. He grew up to be a big ol' douche and murdered a couple, Thomas and Jackie Hawkes, on their yacht which he had been pretending to buy.



Don King
The boxing mogul shot a man in the back, but was found to be justified during a burglary. Not long after that incident, he stomped a man to death who worked for him and owed him $600. He spent four years in prison. Whoa. He's totally learned his lesson.





10/20/14

Truest True Crime Movies

Many people claim an interest in true crime books, movies or news reports is morbid, sick even. They take great strides to tell the rest of us how gratifying it is to the killer when we want to know what happened. They demand to know "who knows the victims' names" and toss around insults to those whose curiosity and interests are peaked.

The truth, however, is that without an interest in the "who, what, why and how" these things happen, there will never be an end to it. All the prison time and state sanctioned murders in the country will not stop it. Only an understanding of the acts can prevent them.

In keeping with that theory, there are many amazingly insightful movies about true crimes that not only depict the crimes in horrifyingly realistic detail, but show all sides of the crimes and criminals for a whole picture. In fact, some true crime movies and documentaries have won worldwide awards for the light they shed on such horrific acts and those who commit them. 

Here are some of the most renown true crime films ever made in no particular order. 

The Thin Blue Line
Not every true crime fan thinks of this one. It is the story of the investigation of a Dallas, Texas police officer and the corrupt police force therein. Drifter, Randall Adams, ran out of gas and after a 16 year old runaway, David Harris, picked him up, they went on a day-long pleasure excursion; drinking beer, smoking pot, hanging out and catching a movie. Adams returned to his hotel room where his brother was also staying, and went to sleep. He was arrested and charged with the murder of a police officer shortly after. The problem however was there wasn't any evidence that connected him to the crime. David Harris was a runaway in the throes of a crime spree and eventually ended up on death row.   




Cropsey
Released in 2009, the filmmakers delve into their own childhood myth and track down the origins of their neighborhood boogeyman and  5 missing children. This film also says a lot about mental health and law and order in the 70's. If you're a child of the 70's, it's an interesting take on the way we lived in those days. In the end, you're left wondering if the killer was ever mentally ill at all or just a very clever man. You can see it free here: CROPSEY .

The Cheshire Murders
This HBO film is a documentary about the murder of a woman and her two daughters in Connecticut. The husband/father lived. The interesting part about this film is how many it times it shows you where this crime could have been prevented as well as a whole host of police screw ups in the investigation. It cumulates into a high profile death penalty case.

 

How Terri-Lynne McClintic Became a Killer

This documentary tells the story of little Victoria "Tori" Elizabeth Marie Stafford, 8; her life and death at the hands of Terri-Lynne McClintic,18, and Michael Rafferty, 28,. The pair abducted, raped and murdered the young girl. The shocking part of this case is not only the horrific crime, but the fact that the mother was the prime suspect, despite a witness coming forth to identify a video of a woman luring the girl away. The film then goes into Terri-lynne's life. She was raised by strippers and molested repeatedly from an early age. She lived a life of horrific abuse of every type and never knew anything but that. She never had a day that did not hold rape or a beating or drug abuse. So many people blame themselves for knowing what was happening and not stepping in. Although some did, the authorities did nothing. It's an interesting view of the making of a monster. You can see it for free here: TERRI-LYNNE


10/19/14

Chiquita Bulger Oklahoma


Strangely enough, convicted murderess, Chiquita Bulger, was offered a chance at parole eventually. She was convicted last week in the shooting death of Emily Clark for "snitching", as she told a witness.

 Just before 8 p.m., at the Addison Apartment complex in the 10100 block of E Admiral Blvd. Bulger walked into the apartment and shot Clark in the head. An unnamed witness heard the gunshot and went into the apartment to see someone removing a gun from Bulger's hands and hearing her say Clark was a snitch. Clark's death was Tulsa's 13th death.

Bulger was convicted and sentenced to life in prison with the possibility of parole.