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Showing posts from November 4, 2012

Jennifer Morrissey Called Her Victim to Say She was on the Way to Kill HIm

Woman crusades to save sister’s life, end the death penalty - The Washington Post

Woman crusades to save sister’s life, end the death penalty - The Washington Post:


Woman crusades to save sister’s life, end the death penalty By Tracy Simmons| Religion News Service,  SPOKANE, Wash. — They stood in front of a shopping mall, shackled together, heads down, nameplates dangling around their necks, bearing the names of men and women who have died on America’s death row.
Cal Brown.
Teresa Lewis.
Cameron Todd Willingham.
Behind them, stood Victoria Ann Thorpe, dark makeup painted on her cheeks and a sign painted to look like blood stains waving above her head: “Their blood is on our hands.”
Somehow, despite Thorpe’s gory exterior, she’s approachable.
“Would you like information on the death penalty?” she asks shoppers as they exit the mall, unable to avert their eyes from the scene in front of them. She hands them a clipboard and one by one, they fill out postcards showing their support to abolish the death penalty in Washington. The cards will later be sent to state lawma…

Life Without Parole: A Different Death Penalty | The Nation

Life Without Parole: A Different Death Penalty | The Nation

David R. Dow | October 26, 2012 If you were sentenced to life in prison with no chance of release, how long would you want to live? Would you want to live at all?

I think about these questions often. My clients, inmates on death row, think about them every day. In more than twenty years of representing prisoners facing execution, I’ve had several ask me to waive their appeals so they could hurry up and die. There are some who think any client who “volunteers”—that's our euphemism for giving up—is necessarily irrational. I don't share that view.
  To be sure, two of my clients who told me to waive their appeals were mentally ill, and I fought to keep them from volunteering to die. But the others were perfectly rational. They did not want to spend at least six years, maybe fifteen, appealing their sentences, only to ultimately be strapped to a gurney and injected with poison.
  It’s easy for most people to see their dec…